Productivity Practices from the TeamStrength Leadership Workshop 2016

  • To schedule everything. Time in office, dates with my wife, two hours Monday morning alone to think about growing. – Jared Mellick
  • Tackle the priorities at the beginning of the week. – Shane McGuiness
  • Utilize Outlook to prioritize tasks and emails. Empty my inbox before I leave for the day. – Patrick Mahoney
  • Plan my next day activities prior to going home for the evening. Then work my plan the next day. – Tim Keating
  • At the end of each day, I go somewhere comfortable, away from my desk 500px-Outlook.com_icon.svgDakirby309-Simply-Styled-Microsoft-Outlook-2013and review all of the tasks that are pending and prioritize my time for the following day. I use the Task feature in Outlook to keep a running tally of everything I’m working on, and by spending 30 minutes or so reviewing that list I can relax for the evening and not stress about trying to remember everything that needs to get done the next day. This method also lets me keep an eye on initiatives that get pushed down so I can make sure they get resurfaced. – Lara Triozzi
  • Plan out your month and then back it into weeks and then back into days. – Tricia Washington
  • Plan out my day and take care of the toughest task first. – Scott Hillman
  • Spending 20% of my time (one day a week) focused on long-term strategy. – Jonathan Taylor
  • To use my outlook calendar to schedule everything. I use my calendar to not get caught in the big “time sucks” that often can distract us from getting the “important” things done. – Cliff Ferris
  • Take 15 minutes in the morning and 15 minutes before going home to organize your day, your thoughts and priorities.
  • The more I tackle early in the day the better. I am so much more focused the first few hours of my day.
  • Morning meeting with team 5-15 minutes each day.
  • Get enough sleep every night and try to work on one task at a time.
  • Recently began using a stand-up desk.
  • Do the tough stuff first so you’re not dreading doing it all day.
  • This year I have focused on training key team members on some of the time consuming but necessary tasks that bog me down. I’ve also delegated several projects to these same people which have allowed them to show their skills in areas outside of their normal daily tasks.
  • Getting my personal stuff done before I leave for work and keeping everything in Evernote. When I get something done for myself in the morning, I feel like I’ve already done something good for the day. Evernote helps keep me out of Gmail.
  • Focus on getting three to four key things per day and set aside time to do them that cannot be interrupted.
  • Productivity rituals – setup one task to get done by the end of the day. Critical task.
  • For every new project, briefly break it into small definable tasks and take some time to write these down, keep them handy and cross off when finished. Keeps large issues manageable and prevents stress. Crossing off also gives a sense of accomplishment and motivation to continue.
  • Create one hour blocks of uninterrupted focus during the day. On a good day, I may have three or four.
  • Singular workflow – multi-tasking is evil and inefficient in my opinion. If you are to do one thing today, do it right and thoroughly.
  • Come in early – 6:00 AM is the most productive part of my day.

2016 TeamStrength Leadership Workshop Productivity Practices